Who invented the method of radioactive dating for turin shroud

The result – from three different laboratories – indicated that it did not date from the time of the death of Christ but rather from between AD 12, the early medieval period.

That should have been the end of the matter, but such is the intensity of emotion surrounding the Shroud that the results were disputed almost immediately.

The problem in those days was that carbon-14 is present in such low abundance that for many years very large sample sizes (handkerchief size or larger) would have been required for a measurement to be made.

And removing – and destroying – such a large sample would never have been permitted.

Any material of plant or animal origin, including textiles, wood, bones and leather, can be dated by its content of carbon-14.

Scientists remove a small sample from an object, treat the sample with a strong acid and a strong base, and finally burn it in a small glass chamber to produce carbon dioxide gas.

The Shroud is one of the most important relics in the Christian church and almost from the moment that Willard Libby invented the radiocarbon dating technique in the 1940s, the Shroud has been an obvious and high profile candidate for measurement.When it last was available to the public in 2000, more than three million people saw it.The next viewing will be from April 10 to May 23, 2010 in the Cathedral of Turin.‘The reason why three laboratories were doing the dating was because they wanted an international comparison,’ he explains.The sampling was done under the stringent supervision of Mike Tite of the British Museum.

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The samples were then passed to representatives from the three laboratories who took them back for analysis.

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